Palmer College of Chiropractic offers a Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.) degree. Each candidate for the degree is required to complete a minimum of five academic years (eight months each of classroom work) in the prescribed curriculum. Students transferring from other accredited chiropractic colleges must complete a minimum of 25 percent of the prescribed curriculum while in residence at Palmer College. The final academic year prior to graduation must be completed at the Palmer campus where the degree is being awarded.

The Doctor of Chiropractic curriculum on each campus focuses on the teaching and subsequent evaluation of student performance in 14 areas of clinical competency required by the Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE), plus six additional areas identified and defined by Palmer. These competencies, along with the Palmer Abilities, present our vision of the specific knowledge, skills and attitudes that will be demonstrated by all Palmer graduates in the Doctor of Chiropractic degree program.

Competencies for the Chiropractic Graduate:

CCE Competencies:
  • History Taking
  • Physical Examination
  • Neuromusculoskeletal Examination
  • The Psychosocial Assessment
  • Diagnostic Studies
  • Diagnosis or Clinical Impression
  • Case Management
  • Adjusting Competencies
  • Emergency Care Competencies
  • Case Follow-up and Review
  • Record Keeping
  • The Doctor-Patient Relationship
  • Professional Issues
  • Wellness
  • Ethics and Integrity
  • Non-adjustive Therapeutic Procedures
Additional clinical competencies identified by Palmer College:
  • Nutrition
  • Patient Education
  • Business Management Issues
  • Chiropractic History and Philosophy
  • Information Literacy

Each of the competencies has associated with it a cognitive, an affective and a psychomotor component. For example, a student studying radiology examination should, among other things, be able to demonstrate knowledge of the various physical and chemical processes involved in taking an X-ray, demonstrate an attitudinal awareness of patient apprehensions and discomfort, and demonstrate the capability to select a proper exposure technique. 

Davenport Campus D.C. Program

  • Anatomy
    • Gross Anatomy I
      • 4 Credit(s)
        This course will focus on neural, muscular, vascular and skeletal systems within the upper and lower extremities of the human body. Lectures will consider the contribution and integration of each system to the function of that extremity. Lecture and lab.
    • Neuroanatomy I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The course covers microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of the brain, spinal cord and meninges. Physiological organization is also discussed and general lesions are reviewed. Lecture and lab.
    • Embryology
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course introduces normal and abnormal morphogenesis of the organ systems of the human body during development. Physiological development of the neural, muscular and skeletal system, including human genetics and embryonic mechanisms basic to teratogenesis will be examined.
    • Gross Anatomy II
      • 4 Credit(s)
        The anatomy of the body wall and contents of the major body cavities will be studied. Gross anatomical features of the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive, endocrine, and lymphatic systems will be examined. Functional and clinical aspects of the anatomy will be addressed. Lecture and lab.
    • Spinal Anatomy
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Musculo-skeletal associations of the vertebral column, head, neck and thoracic wall will be studied in depth. Arthrology of the vertebral column will be presented. Lecture and Lab.
    • Neuroanatomy II
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course presents the peripheral nervous system and its role in maintaining the health and integrity of the human body, and focuses on how interference with normal functions of the nervous system may cause dysfunction or disease. The peripheral nervous system consists of the cranial nerves, spinal nerves and peripheral visceral nervous system. The structures involved with the special senses of vision, hearing, balance, taste, smell and touch are also studied.
    • Organ Histology
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course will take a functional approach to the survey of the microscopic anatomy of most systems. In addition, lectures will cover some of the more significant processes of development, dysfunction, degeneration and healing.
    • Life Science Review
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The course will cover all major aspects of life sciences. Topics include general anatomy, spinal anatomy, pathology, physiology, chemistry and microbiology.
  • Chiropractic Business and Practice Management
    • Rights & Responsibilities
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Within the context of the chiropractic profession, this course addresses applied ethics in both personal and professional settings and offers an introduction to interpersonal communication. Methods used include student- and instructor-led discussion, lecture, guest speakers, surveys, small group activities, and reading assignments. Written assignments must also be completed and submitted.
    • Financial Management
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course introduces payment options and fee structures within a professional practice including cash practice, insurance-based practice and participation in managed care organizations. Procedures for insurance claims submissions and management will be included and collection strategies will be discussed. The basic principles of financial and records management will also be discussed.
    • Legal Issues
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This course focuses on the basics of jurisprudence, risk management strategies, ethics and practice liability issues related to chiropractic practice, principles of law associated with clinical practice and the chiropractic profession at large; relationships of its providers to each other, third party payers, malpractice insurance carriers, and the society in general; basics of contract and chiropractor regarding the doctor patient relationship and standard of care issues; and the basics of child/adult abuse reporting related to the issues of malpractice.
    • Practice Management
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Within the context of a business plan, this course prepares the student for the organization, management and contingency planning for chiropractic practice. Contract negotiations, business aspects of delivering care, supervision of employees and collection policies for chiropractic health care related services will be included. Effective communication skills will be addressed featuring interactions with patients, employees, vendors and other professionals.
    • Regulatory Issues
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This course addresses regulatory issues related to the practice of chiropractic, including AIDS/HIV, OSHA, HIPAA, sexual harassment prevention, professional boundaries, child and dependent adult abuse reporting, and communicable disease reporting.
    • Planning for Practice Success
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This independent study is devoted to final preparation for the student to enter chiropractic practice. The focus is on decision making, goal setting and professional interactions resulting in the successful implementation of post graduate plans.
  • Clinic
    • Intro to Clinical Practice
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This course introduces the students to the components of communication as it relates to a patient education program, including the Report of Findings. The student will be introduced to the basic elements of record documentation (SOAP notes), and to the regulations relative to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) and Professional Boundaries.
    • Emergency Procedures
      • 2 Credit(s)
        The course covers basic procedures used in an emergency situation. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be certified in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
    • Clinical Methods
      • 2 Credit(s)
        The course introduces the student to patient care through care of a paired student patient, with gradual responsibility for care of additional students, student family members, Palmer alumni and Palmer employees. It integrates information obtained from the patient history, physical examination, laboratory tests, radiographic studies and chiropractic analysis to result in a working diagnosis and appropriate record keeping. Students provide care for patients under the supervision of the faculty clinicians in the Campus Health Center.
    • Clinical Case Correlations I
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Students will enhance their understanding of the management of different cases and patient presentations. The application of evidence-based clinical practice will be explored.
    • Clinic I
      • 5 Credit(s)
        Interns continue in their development of clinical competency through patient care in the Campus Health Center. Upon recommendation of the Campus Health Center faculty plus other requirements, interns transfer to the Palmer Clinic outpatient care facility where they assume responsibility for outpatients assigned to faculty clinicians. Patient care takes place under the supervision and direction of the faculty clinicians who assess the intern's clinical competency on a continual basis.
    • OSCE-Clinical
      • 0 Credit(s)
        8th Trimester clinical competency exam.
    • OSCE-Radiology
      • 0 Credit(s)
        8th Trimester radiology competency exam.
    • Clinical Case Correlations II
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Students will develop their understanding of the management of different cases and patient presentations, including documentation. Evidence-based clinical practice concepts will be applied.
    • Clinic II
      • 5 Credit(s)
        Interns continue in their development of clinical competency through continued care of patients in Palmer Clinic outpatient facilities with daily assessment by faculty clinicians.
    • Clinical Case Correlations III
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course provides a capstone experience for the student's educational experience. Designed to provide integration of subject matter attained throughout the curriculum, the student has an opportunity to interact with previous instructors from basic sciences, chiropractic and clinical divisions as well as administrative personnel. Through instructor presentations, student presentations and interactive dialogue, students will reflect on their chiropractic education and their future practice expectations and have an opportunity to have questions addressed.
    • Clinic III
      • 8 Credit(s)
        Interns continue in their development of clinical competency through continued care of patients in a Palmer Clinic outpatient facility or at a chiropractic field doctor's office through the Intern Preceptorship Program, an optional program for qualified students. Interns continue to be assessed daily by faculty clinicians or are evaluated by preceptor field doctors. Additional programs offered for Clinic III interns include the Clinical Teaching Assistant and Residency Assistant Programs.
  • Diagnosis
    • Physical Diagnosis I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        In this course students learn to perform a comprehensive case history and physical examination of the vital signs and head and neck. Students are expected to correlate the historical and physical data in order to arrive at a differential diagnosis and prudent management plan. When relevant to the diagnosis, additional studies and specialty consultations are addressed.
    • NMS Diagnosis I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The course covers physical diagnostic procedures specific to the neuromusculoskeletal system. It focuses on the head, neck and upper extremities from a clinical perspective. It accentuates the development of professional demeanor, clinical judgment, patient management and follow-up.
    • Physical Diagnosis II
      • 3 Credit(s)
        In this course students learn to perform a physical examination of the lungs, heart and abdomen. Students are also expected to correlate the historical and physical data in order to arrive at a differential diagnosis and prudent management plan. When relevant to the diagnosis or management, additional studies and specialty consultations are addressed.
    • Male-Female Health
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course covers topics in male and female health across the lifespan. Concepts related to reproduction and pregnancy will also be introduced. Emphasis will include evaluation of the gender-related systems including Proctological and Gynecological examinations performed on anatomical models. Evidence- informed health promotion and disease prevention guidelines and resources for patients and chiropractors will be introduced and explored.
    • Geriatrics
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This interactive course emphasizes health and wellness in the aging individual, and normal and abnormal age-related changes. Strategies to enhance the aging experience will be examined, including specific chiropractic management considerations and evidence-based health promotion and resources for aging persons. Age-related disease prevention, interdisciplinary communication, and cultural competency in elder care will be included.
    • NMS Diagnosis II
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The course covers physical diagnostic procedures specific to the neuromusculoskeletal system. It focuses on the trunk and lower extremities from a clinical perspective. It also accentuates the development of professional demeanor, clinical judgment, patient management, and follow-up.
    • Obstetrics/Pediatrics
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course is divided into two sections. The first section covers normal physiologic changes of the pregnant patient as well as clinical manifestations of aberrant physiology and disorders. Issues related to conception, pregnancy and birth are also discussed. The second portion of the course covers normal physiology of the pediatric patient as well as clinical manifestations of aberrant physiology and disorders. Appropriate adaptations to history taking and physical exam procedures learned in previous courses are reviewed. Clinical judgment, patient management, chiropractic care and follow-up of these patients are addressed.
    • Visceral Disorders/Lab Interpretation
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Chiropractors, as primary care/portal of entry providers should be well versed in not only the evaluation of visceral disorders/dysfunction by clinical laboratory testing, but also in the appropriate management of patients with visceral dysfunction when indicated or by consulting with or referring to another health care provider as needed. This course is a case based approach to visceral disorders and clinical laboratory interpretation. Doctors of chiropractic should also be aware of the standard of care issues as it relates to clinical laboratory testing and visceral disorders/dysfunction. Numerous case studies with clinical relevancy will be presented throughout the course.
    • Clinical Psychology
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This course reviews the history of chiropractic and the treatment of mental illness. Consideration is given to the definition of mental illness, assessment, and treatment or referral protocol. Management of stress, communication, and the doctor/patient relationship are also covered in order to facilitate better treatment outcomes.
    • Differential Diagnosis
      • 2 Credit(s)
        The course covers the integration of the patient history, physical exam, diagnostic imaging, laboratory and other diagnostic procedures to develop differential diagnoses and a patient management plan. Emphasis will be on the principles of evidence-informed clinical practice.
  • Rehabilitation
    • Physiotherapy I: Passive Care
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course will provide the chiropractic student with evidence based fundamental knowledge and skill which will enable the student to make basic decisions about prescribing and using therapeutic modalities to restore and enhance function, improve physical skills, prevent re-injury, facilitate the chiropractic adjustment, stimulate healing and control pain, edema and muscle spasm. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking and decision making skills incorporating evidence based modality selection considering patient diagnosis, stage of healing and contraindications in generating the most appropriate management plan through all phases of care. An overview of various manual therapies will also be included.
    • Physiotherapy II: Active Care
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course will provide the chiropractic student with fundamental knowledge and skill which will enable the student to make basic decisions about prescribing and using the therapeutic exercise and rehabilitation to restore or enhance function, improve physical skills, prevent re-injury, correct and prevent subluxation, and promote wellness and active lifestyles. It will address the relationship between subluxation and exercise. Using fundamentals developed in earlier trimesters, the focus will be on prescription, development, and progression of rehabilitation and exercise programs that will address the conditions most commonly seen in the general practice of chiropractic. An overview of outcome measures will also be included.
  • Library
  • Pathology
    • General Pathology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course is an introduction to the basic changes that occur in the disease process. Topics covered include cellular injury and death; inflammation and tissue repair; hemodynamic, neoplasm, genetic, and pediatric disorders.
    • Immunology
      • 2 Credit(s)
        The course introduces the basis of immunity, phagocytosis, complement, humoral mechanisms and specific acquired immunity. Also, antigen presentation, lymphocyte trafficking, and restraining the immune system will be covered. Additional topics include immunological memory, vaccination, immunodeficiency, the hygiene hypothesis and cancer and the immune system. The links between the nervous system and the immune system will be discussed.
    • Microbiology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course addresses the basic structure, function and growth requirements of microorganisms, as well as methods for controlling their growth and transmission. This will be followed by a study of the major pathogenic bacteria, fungi, parasites, as well as pathogenic helminths. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between virulence of the microorganism and the resistance of the host. Relevance to chiropractic clinical practice will also be emphasized.
    • Systems Pathology I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course is an introduction to the systemic changes that occur in the disease process. Topics covered include disorders of the musculoskeletal system, peripheral nervous system, central nervous system, blood vessels, heart, and alimentary tract.
    • Public Health
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This course addresses the health issues facing today's communities, from the foundations of community health to the health of the nation, healthcare delivery and environmental health and safety.
    • Systems Pathology II
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course is an introduction to the systemic changes that occur in the disease process. Topics covered include disorders of the respiratory system, integumentary system, genitourinary tract, breast, hematopoietic system, and lymphatic system.
    • Toxicology
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course deals with the basic principles of pharmacology and toxicology, including drug dose and dose response, toxic effects and interactions. In addition, drug-drug and drug-food interactions and drug induced nutrient depletions will be discussed in detail. Common drug classes will be discussed along with their function, side effects, and nutrient interactions.
  • Philosophy
    • Philosophy I
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This lecture, workshop, and discussion class serves as an introduction to the principles and practices of the chiropractic profession. The unique chiropractic paradigm of facilitating self-healing and wellness by reducing nerve interference through the correction of subluxation by chiropractic adjustments will be explored.
    • Philosophy II
      • 1 Credit(s)
        The development of the chiropractic profession is studied through its history from discovery to the present, emphasizing the contributions of key individuals and events. Evolution of different clinical approaches (chiropractic techniques) is introduced. Antecedents to chiropractic philosophy and practice will be presented. An introduction is given to the traditional Thirty-Three Principles of Stephenson.
    • Philosophy III
      • 1 Credit(s)
        A philosophic exploration of the evolution of the hypotheses describing the subluxation complex and its application to matters of health and illness will be undertaken. The major hypothesis of chiropractic, the subluxation complex, will be discussed in depth. The student will become conversant with the history of subluxation terminology and the current status of some of the major hypotheses pertaining to the subluxation complex. Also to be presented are causes and prevention of the subluxation, with clinical examples presented where relevant.
    • Philosophy IV
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The philosophic relationship between chiropractic principles and clinical application is studied. This lecture and discussion-based course explores the practical applications of chiropractic philosophy to practice management and the management of patients. The course explores patient education relative to the chiropractic model with a health care class presentation.
    • Philosophy V
      • 1 Credit(s)
        The application of chiropractic philosophy to the personal development of chiropractic is explored. This capstone course will endeavor to integrate concepts and principles from prior courses to prepare the senior student for clinical practice. Open class discussions, guest presenters, and written assignments will provide an opportunity for students to articulate and defend their own evolving philosophical convictions, and explore how to operationalize them in defining practice goals and aspirations.
  • Physiology and Biochemistry
    • Biochemistry I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course is to serve as a foundation for several life science courses. Lecture topics include the structures, function, digestion and absorption of biologically important molecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins and minerals. Enzyme kinetics, regulation of enzyme activity, and maintenance of pH in the body will also be discussed. Normal and abnormal physiology related to these biologically important molecules will be considered.
    • Cellular Physiology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The cellular physiology course is an in-depth study of the structure and function of the eukaryotic cells, especially the human body cells. It has been designed to provide a perspective from which the cell can be viewed as a dynamic intricately attuned system. Cellular organelles, cell-cell communication, eukaryotic genome, flow of genetic information from DNA-RNA-Protein, and gene expression are emphasized. The course also covers cellular neurophysiology of excitable cells, the resting potential and action potentials, synaptic transmission and membrane receptor. Homeostasis is an integral part of the course.
    • Physiology I
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This course will examine the structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, and muscular systems. It will also study the structure and function of fascia, and related structures, such as tendons and ligaments, as well as discussing the major types of spinal cord reflexes.
    • Biochemistry II
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The course covers human metabolism, including carbohydrates, lipids and nitrogenous compounds. Vitamins and coenzymes are discussed. Energy use and metabolic control are considered for each pathway.
    • Physiology II
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course covers the physiology of the nervous system. Topics include somatic sensation, special senses, motor control, and physiology of the autonomic nervous system. Higher cortical function will be studied. In addition, interactions between the nervous, endocrine and immune systems will be reviewed.
    • Endocrinology
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course will consist of a lecture sequence in which the normal and some abnormal physiology of each gland or structure displaying endocrine function will be discussed. The site of synthesis, function, mechanism of action, and the regulation of hormones will be the center of discussion.
    • Physiology III
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course covers the physiology of the cardiovascular, lymphatic, pulmonary and renal systems. Cardiovascular topics include mechanics, electrical activity of the heart, hemodynamics, control of blood flow and blood pressure. Pulmonary topics include mechanics of ventilation, pulmonary circulation, respiratory diffusion of gases, blood transport of respiratory gases, chemical and neural control of ventilation. Renal topics studied include body fluid physiology, glomerular function of the kidney, neural control of the bladder, and renal transport mechanisms. Additional areas of coverage include regulation of osmolality, extracellular fluid regulation, regulation of potassium and acid-base balance by the kidney.
    • Nutrition
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course is designed to study the role of dietary nutrients in the maintenance of health and disease prevention. Nutritional characteristics of macronutrients and micronutrients will be discussed in detail, along with interpretation of food labels. In addition, the class discussion will focus on eating disorders, dietary trends, and obesity.
    • Biomechanics
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course will cover basic biomechanics of the spine primarily, and to some extent, extremities and soft tissue. The student will be introduced to tissue mechanics, including adaptations to various stimuli. A significant portion of the course is dedicated to spinal biomechanics, including the parameters of subluxation complex and adjustive procedures. Special attention is continually paid to the clinical application of biomechanics, including optimal biomechanical motion in the prevention of injury.
    • Clinical Nutrition
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course focuses on nutritional strategies for managing disorders of the musculoskeletal and organ systems. The role of specific nutrients in the etiology, prevention, and management of common disorders seen in chiropractic practices, as well as weight control will be discussed. Nutritional assessment strategies and subsequent patient plans will be determined.
  • Radiology
    • Radiographic Physics
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course introduces radiologic technology and physics. Topics will include the production, control and principles of x-ray exposure, radiographic equipment design and usage, safe darkroom procedures, image development and quality, radiobiology, and radiation protection of patient, doctor and staff.
    • Diagnostic Imaging I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course covers methods of diagnostic imaging, normal anatomy and normal variants of the skeletal system, roentgenometrics, congenital anomalies, endocrine, metabolic, nutritional and arthritic conditions of bone. It is an overview of plain film radiography along with some discussion and visualization of specialized imaging procedures including nuclear bone scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as related to the case work-up. Patient management and various medical and legal aspects are also discussed.
    • Diagnostic Imaging II
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course covers radiographic evaluation of the skeletal system including, but not limited to, neoplasia, trauma to the spine and trauma to the extremities, as well as osteomyelitis, septic arthritis and hematological diseases of bone. It is an overview of plain film radiography along with some discussion and visualization of specialized imaging procedures including nuclear bone scintigraphy, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as related to case work-up. Patient management and various medical and legal aspects are also discussed.
    • Radiographic Positioning-Spine
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This course will prepare the student to create diagnostic images of the axial spine. Positioning lecture material will be supported by experiential lab exercises to include radiation safety practices. The application of relevant legal and ethical standards will be discussed.
    • Radiographic Positioning-Extremities
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course is a continuation in the study of radiographic positioning with emphasis on extremity, chest and abdomen setups. Additionally, strategies for image improvement and procedural adaptations for special patient populations are explored. The application of relevant legal and ethical standards continues.
    • Imaging: Chest & Abdomen
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This course covers methods of imaging, normal anatomy and normal variants of the chest, abdomen, head and neck.
  • Research
    • Foundations of Evidence Based Clinical Practice
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This course will provide the student with a foundation in evidence-based clinical practice. Emphasis will be placed on asking good clinical questions, acquiring knowledge, and appraising the literature. Information will be provided on the services and resources available through Palmer's library. Students will also discuss the hierarchy of evidence and study design.
    • Evidence Based Chiropractic
      • 1 Credit(s)
        The course is designed for students with little or no experience in clinical or epidemiological research. The course focuses on the chiropractor as a research consumer. Fundamental research concepts and techniques necessary for critical reading of the professional and research literature will be taught. Examples of application of research concepts will be provided from chiropractic research literature.
  • Clinical Enrichment/Electives
    • Logan Basic
      • 0 Credit(s)
        The course is designed to teach the Logan Basic Technique. It includes anatomy, body mechanics, body distortions, adjusting technique, X-ray and heel lifts.
    • Advanced Soft Tissue
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course will develop a greater understanding of chiropractic rehabilitation concepts. The course will include review of functional anatomy, joint mechanics, gait analysis, and movement patterns.
    • Lumbar Distraction Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course includes the latest research in the biomechanics of the lumbar spine, the diagnostic evaluation of these dynamics and the correction methods available to address each entity.
    • Thompson Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        The Thompson Technique is a low force, specific adjustment technique, which includes the Derefield-Thompson Leg Analysis System.
    • Activator Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course includes spinal analysis and adjusting procedures of the Activator Methods technique.
    • NUCCA Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course covers X-Ray techniques, upper cervical biomechanics, and adjusting techniques for the four basic types of atlas subluxation complex.
    • SOT I Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course deals with the philosophy and fundaments of SOT technique.
    • SOT II Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course is a continuation of SOT I.
    • Pettibon Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course covers the concepts of the Pettibon Technique, which includes adjusting, spinal rehabilitation procedures, X-ray procedures, practice management procedures and spinal trauma documentation.
    • Atlas Orthogonal Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course covers methods of locating cervical spinal subluxations using the Atlas Orthogonal technique.
    • Blair Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        The Blair Technique is a specific system of analyzing and adjusting the upper cervical vertebrae (atlas/axis primarily). It relies on natural asymmetry of the body to formalize an adjustment designed specifically for that patient. Special X-rays are taken (protractor and stereo) for determining the listings. Use of instrumentation, leg checks and palpation are also covered.
  • Technique
    • Palpation
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Basic clinical palpation will be introduced with emphasis on the structural and functional examination of the spine and related structures. Soft tissue palpation and posture analysis are also presented.
    • Subluxation Analysis
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course lays the foundation of the spinal subluxation evaluation as presented in the technique and clinic curriculum with emphasis on thermographic instrumentation. The components and related assessment procedures of the vertebral subluxation complex will be presented in a stepwise process with an emphasis on integration of clinical findings. These clinical findings will also be related to clinical guidelines relative to the PART system.
    • Toggle Recoil
      • 2 Credit(s)
        The biomechanics of the upper cervical spine are presented, as well as a reinforcement of static and motion palpation skills. Palmer Upper Cervical Specific X-ray analysis and adjusting procedures are presented. The use of chiropractic instrumentation and leg checks are presented as they pertain to upper cervical practice.
    • Cervical Technique
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The analytical and adjusting procedures for evaluating the cervical and upper thoracic spine for vertebral subluxations are presented. These procedures include: Chiropractic X-ray analysis; instrumentation; static and motion palpation; range of motion, orthopedic, and neurological examination. Evaluation of the patient's spine is discussed so that the chiropractor in training may evaluate when, where, and how to adjust appropriately. The adjusting procedures presented in class cover Gonstead and Diversified cervical and upper thoracic techniques. Prior technique material is reviewed in perspective of the evaluation of the cervical and upper thoracic spine.
    • Thoracolumbar Technique
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course presents the biomechanics of the thoracolumbar spine. It also reinforces the evaluation processes and clinical reasoning involved in this area. The skills taught or reinforced include the clinical interview, neurological evaluation, orthopedic testing, range of motion evaluation, visual evaluation, static and motion palpation, and radiographic analysis. Evaluation of the patient's thoracic and lumbar spine is discussed so that the doctor in training may evaluate when, where and how to adjust this area appropriately. The doctor in training also will learn post-evaluation methods to monitor patient care. Prior technique material is reviewed with the chiropractic spinal analysis and adjusting procedures appropriately emphasized.
    • Pelvic Technique
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Palpation skills for the sacroiliac articulations are reinforced, as well as introducing a comprehensive study of pelvic mechanics. Adjusting procedures and X-ray analysis for the pelvic region are presented. Chiropractic instrumentation is reviewed. Evaluation of the typical patient's pelvic spine is discussed so that the doctor in training may evaluate when, where, and how to adjust this area appropriately. Pediatric, geriatric, and special consideration patients, i.e., antalgic adjusting protocols, are discussed relevant to the need for varied depth, speed, and the contact points utilized.
    • Technique Principles & Practice
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course is an enhancement of the spinal evaluation and adjusting procedures presented in the technique curriculum. The fine points of spinal evaluation and adjusting procedures are covered, with an emphasis on clinical application.
    • Extremity Adjusting
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The course emphasizes analytical aspects of extremity care. Consultation, examination and X-ray techniques are covered to determine when and when not to adjust the extremities. Analysis and adjusting of the entire appendicular skeleton are taught.

West Campus D.C. Program

  • Anatomy
    • Gross Anatomy I
      • 7 Credit(s)
        Regional study of the human body, including: body wall and extremities; conceptual approach to fascial compartments; emphasis on clinical correlates. Includes human dissection laboratory and palpation laboratory.
    • Human Embryology
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Audiovisual demonstration on mechanisms of human heredity; development of the human organism from fertilization to parturition; gametogenesis; fertilization; cellular proliferation and differentiation; organ-system development; emphasis on metameric components and their migration during fetal development.
    • Spinal Anatomy & Palpation I
      • 4 Credit(s)
        Detailed study of the human spinal column, including: osteology, syndesmology and myology of the spinal column; radiographic recognition of spinal structures; emphasis on clinical correlates. Human dissection and spinal palpation laboratory.
    • Histology & Cell Physiology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Physiology and cytoarchitectural components of the cell as well as morphologic and functional characteristics of tissues and organ systems are covered.
    • Gross Anatomy II
      • 5 Credit(s)
        Regional study of the human body, including: thoracic and abdominal viscera, external genitalia, face, neurocranium, spinal column, and unique features of the spinal column related to an upright posture. Human dissection and palpation laboratory.
    • Spinal Anatomy & Palpation II
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Spinal palpation laboratory.
    • Neuroanatomy I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The course covers microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of the brain, spinal cord and meninges. Physiological organization is also discussed and general lesions are reviewed.
    • Principles of Chiropractic Analysis
      • 5 Credit(s)
        This course covers the principles of biomechanics, including: static position and dynamic movement of the spine, pelvis and appendicular system; joint mechanics, muscle kinetics and the biomechanics and evaluation of gait. Principles of chiropractic analysis, including nerve facilitation and inhibition and associated musculoskeletal and visceral effects. Introduction to spinal adjusting procedures.
    • Radiographic Anatomy I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Recognition and identification of normal anatomical structures and features of the spine, the extremities, the pelvis and the rib cage, as imaged on plain radiographs; detailed study of normal radiographic anatomy, normal anatomic variants and roentgenometry.
    • Radiographic Anatomy II
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Recognition and identification of normal anatomical structures and features of the skull, and the soft tissues of the thorax and abdomen, as imaged on plain radiographs; detailed study of normal radiographic anatomy, normal anatomic variants and roentgenometry.
    • Basic Science Review
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Review of general concepts for anatomy, physiology, pathology, microbiology and chemistry.
  • Clinical Enrichment/Electives
    • Gonstead Technique I
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Gonstead procedures; mechanisms of injury; motion palpation; instrumentation; X-ray analysis; postural analysis; adjustive procedures to correct subluxations for the entire spine; emphasis on practical work.
    • Gonstead Technique II
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Specific treatment regions using Gonstead procedures; managing problems such as low back pain, neck pain, whiplash degenerative diseases and related clinical entities. Emphasis on practical work.
    • Thompson Terminal Point Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Analytical and adjustive methods as written and practiced by Dr. J. Clay Thompson; Derefield and Cervical Syndrome Analytical procedures; specific approaches to the adjustive correction of pelvic misalignments, spondylolisthesis, ribcage and other spinal areas; terminal point table. Emphasis on practical work.
    • Upper Cervical Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Palmer Toggle Recoil, Grostic, and Atlas Orthogonal Upper Clinical specific methods; specific line-of-correction calculations for a side posture atlas adjustment; chiropractic neuro-orthopedic pre and post adjustment examination. Emphasis on practical work. Comparisons with other total spinal methods.
    • Sacro-Occipital Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Patient categorization and the basic treatment regimens for the S.O.T. categories; blocking methods and category management; analysis of physical findings as written by Dr. M.B. Dejarnette; basic cranial maneuvers. Emphasis on practical experience.
    • Biophysics Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Biophysics technique procedures, including: history; spinal models; analysis; adjustive procedures; cervical adjusting instrument; case management; and exercise.
    • Activator Methods I
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Activator procedures, including; mechanisms of subluxation; analysis; adjustive procedures; and light force Activator adjusting instrument.
    • Sports Chiropractic I
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Hands-on training for the most common adjunctive, on-the-field treatment approaches, including: taping, stretching, myofascial stripping, cross-friction and other massage techniques.
    • Craniosacral Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Potential effects of aberrant cranial motion on health and well-being; potential mechanisms of cranial therapy.
    • Cox Flexion Distraction Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Theory and application of flexion distraction methods for treatment of mechanical and discogenic low back pain. Emphasis on practical application skills.
    • Sports Chiropractic II
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Preparation of the student for emergencies that may occur at a sporting event.
    • Nutrition in Practice
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Topics in clinical nutrition, including; dietary analysis; use of supplements; laboratory, history and exam findings; dietary protocols; detoxification programs; evaluation of progress. Clinical case studies will be presented.
  • Chiropractic Procedures
    • Emergency Procedures
      • 2 Credit(s)
        First aid and emergency care, including: poisoning, emergency traumas and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults and children. Upon completion of the class, the student will be certified in CPR.
    • Principles of Chiropractic Technique
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Principles and practice of spinal evaluation and full spine adjusting techniques.
    • Lumbopelvic Technique & Management
      • 5 Credit(s)
        Principles and practice of analysis and adjustive procedures relative to the lumbar spine and pelvis, including: orthopedic, neurologic and radiographic evaluation; basic differential algorithms and management protocols.
    • Thoracic Spine Technique & Management
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Principles and practice of analysis and adjustive procedures relative to the thoracolumbar spine and thoracic cage, including: orthopedic, neurologic and radiographic evaluation; basic differential algorithms and management protocols.
    • Lower Extremity Technique & Management
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Principles and practice of analysis and adjustive procedures relative to the lower extremities, including: orthopedic, neurologic and radiographic evaluation; basic differential algorithms and management protocols for maintaining proper joint function and postural alignment.
    • Physical Therapy I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Study of the physiological principles underlying the use of those physical therapy modalities and procedures supportive of the chiropractic approach to health care.
    • Cervical Spine Technique & Management
      • 4 Credit(s)
        Principles and practice of analysis and adjustive procedures relative to the cervical spine and cervico-thoracic region, including: orthopedic, neurologic and radiographic evaluation; basic differential algorithms and management protocols for maintaining proper joint function and postural alignment.
    • Upper Extremity Technique & Management
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Principles and practice of analysis and adjustive procedures relative to the upper extremities, including: orthopedic, neurologic and radiographic evaluation; basic differential algorithms and management protocols for maintaining proper joint function and postural alignment.
    • Physical Therapy II
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Practical experiences in the application of physical therapy modalities that support chiropractic clinical practice, including: techniques of application; indications; contra-indications; and limitations.
    • Radiographic Technology I
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Practical training in the technical aspects of conducting radiographic examinations, including: exposure factors; patient positioning; proper use of equipment; patient/operator protection; darkroom procedures; and patient communications for spine, chest, rib, abdominal and skull views.
    • Correlative Technique & Management
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Review and correlation of the technique and management protocols of the most commonly used chiropractic spinal adjusting techniques. Practical training in selecting appropriate spinal adjusting techniques to meet the patients needs is done.
    • Radiographic Technology II
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Practical training in the technical aspects of conducting radiographic examinations, including: exposure factors; patient positioning; proper use of equipment; patient/operator protection; darkroom procedures; and patient communications for upper and lower extremities. Practical training in the development and maintenance of X-ray quality assurance programs in chiropractic clinical practice. Students will complete diagnostic imaging requirements on phantom models.
    • Rehabilitation & Exercise Management
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Practical training in techniques of spinal and extremity joint strengthening, stabilization and flexibility, including: fitness evaluation; exercise prescription; the use of rehabilitation equipment; back school programs; and myofascial techniques, including trigger points, cross friction massage, and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation.
  • Clinic
    • Ethics & Jurisprudence
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Professional ethics and legal aspects of practice; doctor/patient relationship; necessity for comprehensive and complete case history records and procedures; legal responsibilities relating to patient care, including malpractice lawsuits; doctor/lawyer relationships; insurance and personal injury court proceedings.
    • Clinic I
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Provide students instruction and evaluation regarding the policies and procedures of the San Jose, California Campus Clinic System, including a review of quality improvement principles and their practical application in chiropractic practice, digital x-ray software, HIPAA and electronic patient records. This course marks the beginning of the student's internship in the campus student clinic with practical clinical training and demonstration of clinical competency via assessment of a Qualitative Evaluation (QE) process.
    • Clinic II
      • 5 Credit(s)
        This course marks the beginning of the student's internship in the campus public (outpatient) clinic. Students are mentored in the evaluation and management of outpatients during the delivery of chiropractic care; emphasis on development of professional skills through observation and experience. Assessment of clinical competency in a Qualitative Evaluation (QE) process.
    • Clinic III
      • 8 Credit(s)
        Progress continues toward meeting the campus clinical graduation requirements. Continuation of outpatient care with increasing responsibility; further experience in the evaluation and management of chiropractic patients. Assessment of clinical competency in a Qualitative Evaluation (QE) process and CCEP examination.
    • Management of the Chiropractic Practice
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Skills necessary to establish a chiropractic practice; fundamentals of business management; office design; chiropractic office management.
    • Clinic IV
      • 8 Credit(s)
        Final phase of clinic patient care program; continuation of meeting responsibilities of patient care; smooth transition of patients to lower-quarter interns; evaluation by peers and clinic staff of proficiency in chiropractic abilities and completion of clinic requirements. Demonstration of clinical competency.
    • Clinic V-Field Training
      • 8 Credit(s)
        An off-site educational experience intended to enhance the knowledge of the chiropractic intern/student beyond what is normally provided in the chiropractic college curriculum. Core activities include observation and campus-directed participation in a clinical setting of office management and administrative procedures. At the discretion of the preceptor doctor, the student may perform supervised examination and diagnosis, chiropractic adjusting and case management. Completion of any remaining outpatient clinic experiences to meet graduation requirements.
    • Development of the Chiropractic Practice
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Seminar and workshop series addressing the skills and attributes necessary for success in chiropractic practice, including; staff selection and training; billing procedures; management of personal injury and workers compensation cases; report writing; court appearances and deposition testimony on behalf of patients; and developing an ethical and profitable practice.
  • Diagnosis
    • Chiropractic Clinical Evaluation I
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Introduction to basic history taking and general physical examination procedures, including: taking vitals; musculoskeletal evaluation (palpation and range of motion); basic neurologic testing; and peripheral vascular evaluation.
    • Chiropractic Clinical Evaluation II
      • 4 Credit(s)
        Presentation of the most common conditions affecting the low back and physical examination procedures for the low back.
    • Chiropractic Clinical Evaluation III
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Presentation of the most common conditions affecting the thoracic spine and rib cage; physical examination procedures for the thoracic spine, ribs, and chest. Scoliosis evaluation.
    • Chiropractic Clinical Evaluation IV
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Presentation of the most common conditions affecting the cervical spine and physical examination procedures for the head and neck.
    • Clinical Chemistry Data Interpretation
      • 4 Credit(s)
        Methodologies associated with some of the more common and standard laboratory tests. Interpretation, application and correlation of standard laboratory findings, including: hematological and serological studies; urinalysis, fecal examinations and the analysis of other body fluids; and necessity for ordering special tests. Students must also complete a portion of the quantitative clinical requirements for interpretations on simulated cases.
    • Chiropractic Clinical Evaluation V
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The physical examination indicators for eye, ear, nose and throat disorders, cranial nerves, and dermatology. Practical instruction in the use of ophthalmoscope and otoscope.
    • Diagnostic Imaging I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Comprehensive study of diagnostic imaging procedures utilized in the evaluation of visceral diseases common or important in chiropractic clinical practice. Imaging procedures, including: plain X-rays, MRI, nuclear bone scanning, CT, ultrasound, contrast radiography and fluoroscopy, as well as fiber-optic camera methods will be discussed.
    • Differential Diagnosis I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Differential diagnosis of visceral conditions, including the head, chest, and abdomen. Cardiovascular, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary complaints will be discussed. Case studies and use of the oto-ophthalmoscope.
    • Diagnostic Imaging II
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Comprehensive study of diagnostic imaging procedures utilized in the evaluation of lumbar spine, pelvis, and lower extremity conditions common or important in chiropractic clinical practice. Imaging procedures, including: plain X-rays, MRI, nuclear bone scanning, CT, ultrasound, contrast radiography and fluoroscopy, as well as fiber-optic camera methods will be studied.
    • Correlative Clinical Evaluation
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Integration of clinical evaluation procedures for the entire body using patient scenarios. Summative and formative assessment of student performance of patient evaluation procedures, history taking skills, documentation and patient records, critical thinking and evidence-based practice skills.
    • Differential Diagnosis II - Low Back
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Differential diagnosis of neurological and musculoskeletal conditions of the low back based on case presentations.
    • Differential Diagnosis II - Lower Extremity
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Differential diagnosis of neurological and musculoskeletal conditions of the lower extremity based on case presentations.
    • Diagnostic Imaging III
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Comprehensive study of diagnostic imaging procedures utilized in the evaluation of cervical, thoracic, cranial and upper extremity conditions common or important in chiropractic clinical practice. Imaging procedures, including: X-rays, MRI, nuclear bone scanning, CT, ultrasound, contrast radiography and fluoroscopy, as well as fiber-optic camera methods will be studied.
    • Differential Diagnosis III - Cervical Spine TMJ
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Differential diagnosis of neurological and musculoskeletal conditions of the cervical spine and TMJ based on case presentations.
    • Differential Diagnosis III - Upper Extremity
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Differential diagnosis of neurological and musculoskeletal conditions of the upper extremity based on case presentations.
    • Clinical Diagnostic Seminar I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Integrated clinic and classroom instruction on basic clinic operational procedures; reinforcement of clinical skills (assessment, management, record keeping and report of findings) utilizing clinic and standardized patient cases; and development of professional behaviors (goal process, patient recruitment, attitudes and responsibilities).
    • Clinical Diagnostic Seminar II
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Exploration and application of principles contained in Healthy People 2010, with emphasis on chiropractic perspectives on stroke and diabetes; continued development of professional behaviors (goal process, patient recruitment, attitudes and responsibilities); and presentation and discussion of actual clinical cases with an evidenced-based approach to patient assessment and care plan.
    • Clinical Diagnostic Seminar III
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Presentation and discussion of actual clinical cases with an evidenced-based approach to patient assessment and care plan; continued development of professional behaviors (goal process, patient recruitment, attitudes and responsibilities); and detailed study of Worker's Compensation and Personal Injury systems, with an overview of office software and spreadsheet usage.
    • Clinical Diagnostic Seminar IV
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Review of patient care protocols, patient management, and office management practices as observed during field training assignments. Small group discussion led by faculty members on evaluation and analysis of practice patterns of field practitioners.
  • Microbiology and Pathology
    • General Pathology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        General cellular and tissue alterations common to all processes of disease, including: cell injury and cell death; inflammation and repair; fluid and hemodynamic derangements; hemopoeitic diseases. Diseases of the immune system, including: systemic diseases and infectious diseases; environmental effects.
    • Neuroscience I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Function of the nervous system, including: electrical properties of excitable membranes; nerve impulse generation and conduction; receptors, muscle and synapses; operations of simple networks of neurons; topics of sensory physiology, reflexes and the control of movement and posture; phenomena and mechanisms of sleep, memory, cerebral dominance and language.
    • Microbiology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Principles of systematic medical microbiology, including: morphology, cultural characteristics, biomechanical characteristics, resistance, anti-genicity and pathogenicity. Communicable and infectious diseases; including: bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites.
    • Neuroscience II
      • 4 Credit(s)
        Anatomy of the peripheral nervous system. Pathophysiology of neurological and muscular diseases; emphasis on clinical considerations.
    • Gastrointestinal, Endocrine & Urogenital Pathology
      • 4 Credit(s)
        Pathophysiology of gastrointestinal, endocrine and urogenital diseases; emphasis on clinical considerations. Examination of the abdominal and genitourinary regions. Complete examination requirements for proctology on models.
    • Cardiovascular & Pulmonary Pathology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Pathophysiology of cardiovascular and respiratory diseases; acute and chronic abnormalities that affect the hematologic, reticuloendothelial, cardiovascular and respiratory systems of the body. Examination of the heart and lungs.
    • Bone & Joint Pathology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Pathophysiology of skeletal and articular diseases; emphasis on clinical considerations.
    • Public Health I
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Epidemiology and infectious disease management; environmental health; immunology; diagnosis and management of poisoning; substance abuse; over-the-counter drug toxicity.
    • Public Health II
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Preventive health care and health education.
    • Rehabilitation & Exercise I
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Exercise physiology; training in observation of patient posture and function, leading to the application of spinal rehabilitation and prevention exercise protocols.
    • Occupational & Preventative Health
      • 4 Credit(s)
        Principles of occupational health and safety, including: occupational biomechanics; cumulative trauma disorders; ergonomics; worksite analysis; illness prevention; and the Worker's Compensation system. Health psychology principles for promoting wellness and obtaining patient compliance, including: smoking cessation, weight loss, and exercise.
  • Philosophy and Practice
    • Chiropractic Philosophy & Practice I
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Lecture and discussion on the role of the chiropractor as a portal of entry primary health care provider in today's health care delivery system; study of chiropractic history and the principles of chiropractic philosophy, science and art.
    • Evidenced Based Chiropractic I
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Development of skills in critical thinking, clinical questioning, literature search strategies, critical appraisal, application of evidence and evaluation of results. Integration of scientific evidence with clinical experience and patient values. Anatomy of an article; qualitative and quantitative research designs; the process of peer review; search strategies when there is lack of evidence; the inquiry of the scientific foundation for various chiropractic theories. Primer on the history of the relationship between science and philosophy of chiropractic.
    • Chiropractic Philosophy & Practice II
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Concepts and theories of subluxation, including: mechanisms of production and dysfunction; central versus peripheral neurologic effects; spinal and related structural disrelationships; neuromusculo skeletal and visceral dysfunction.
    • Evidenced Based Chiropractic II
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Proficiency in developing clinical questions, literature search strategies, critical appraisal, application of evidence and evaluation of results. Integration of scientific evidence with clinical experience and patient values. In-depth analysis of specific research designs commonly seen in the chiropractic literature. Properties and use of clinical outcome measures; bias, validity, reliability, sensitivity, specificity and concepts in statistics. Professional interaction and debate. Development of verbal and written critical appraisal skills.
    • Chiropractic Philosophy & Practice III
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Practical experience in oral and written methods of communicating chiropractic philosophy and principles to the public.
    • Chiropractic Philosophy & Practice IV
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Lecture/discussion on the role of chiropractic in todays society, including principles of chiropractic philosophy, science and art; concepts and theories of a subluxation; the role of the Doctor of Chiropractic as a direct access primary health care provider and clinician; preparation for successful and competent practice.
  • Physiology
    • Fundamentals of Physiology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Physiology and functional anatomy of the cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, urinary and reproductive systems, and their regulation by the nervous and endocrine systems; special senses; muscle and bone physiology. Physiology laboratory is included
    • Gastrointestinal & Renal Physiology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Gastrointestinal and renal systems, including: control of gastrointestinal motility and secretion; digestion, absorption, transport and storage of nutrients; metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and proteins; metabolic functions of the liver and biliary systems; energetics and metabolic rates; body temperature regulation; importance of the kidneys in maintaining homeostasis; factors regulating acid-base balance and body fluids.
    • Cardiac & Pulmonary Physiology
      • 4 Credit(s)
        Cardiac and respiratory systems are covered, including: regulatory mechanisms and functional anatomy; and emphasis on the control mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of homeostasis.
    • Endocrine & Reproductive Physiology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Physiology and functional anatomy of the endocrine and reproductive systems are covered, including: chemistry, mechanism of action and physiological effects of hormones: pituitary, hypothalamic, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal, pancreatic, gonadal and placental; synergistic effects of hormones; feedback control systems; abnormalities of hormonal secretion; male and female reproductive functions; pregnancy and lactation.
    • Pain & Stress Management
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Physiologic considerations specific to pain and stress. Emphasis on clinical correlates, evaluation and management.
  • Specialties
    • Obstetrics & Gynecology
      • 4 Credit(s)
        Assessment of the female reproductive system, including: anatomy, physiology and pathology; pregnancy and labor; pre and post-natal care; emphasis on chiropractic care and nutrition throughout pregnancy. Students will complete examination requirements for gynecology on models.
    • Clinical Psychology
      • 2 Credit(s)
        A behavioral approach to the assessment, differentiation and management of common mental discords presenting to chiropractors; the process of behavioral change and adherence to health care advice; the influence of the family/social system on individual attitudes and behavior.
    • Pediatrics
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Assessment of the physical and mental development of children, from birth to adolescence, including: history and physical examination procedures; common childhood disorders; and diagnosis and management of the pediatric neuromusculoskeletal system. Includes pediatric spinal adjusting lab class.
    • Geriatrics
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Assessment of the aging process, including: major disorders of old age; chiropractic care of the elderly patient; nutritional and dietary needs; social and economic problems of the elderly.

Florida Campus D.C. Program

  • Care
    • Cervicothoracic Technique
      • 3 Credit(s)
        A study of intermediate history-taking skills and chiropractic analysis related to the cervicothoracic spine. Chiropractic analysis of cervical and thoracic spine subluxations and psychomotor skill development including basic adjusting skills of the cervical and thoracic spine using the Palmer Package chiropractic adjusting techniques will be accomplished. Radiographic signs and mensuration associated with the cervical and thoracic spine will be included.
    • Upper Cervical Technique
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Chiropractic analysis of upper cervical spine subluxation, soft tissue structure palpation and psychomotor skill development including intermediate Palmer Package adjusting skills for the upper cervical spine will be accomplished. Palmer Upper Cervical Specific techniques will be studied. Radiographic signs and mensuration associated with the Palmer Upper Cervical Specific Technique will be introduced. Students will demonstrate basic competency in adjustive procedures for the upper cervical spine.
    • Lumbar Spine & Pelvic Technique
      • 4 Credit(s)
        Chiropractic analysis of spinal and pelvic subluxation, palpation and Palmer Package adjusting skills will be accomplished with an emphasis on the lumbar spine and pelvis. Radiographic signs and mensuration associated with the lumbar spine and pelvis will be introduced.
    • Subluxation Analysis & Full Spine Adjusting
      • 4 Credit(s)
        A comprehensive review of chiropractic analysis of spinal subluxation, including inspection, palpation, skin temperature analysis, leg length analysis and radiographic analysis inclusive of the full spine utilizing the Palmer Package. Intermediate full spine adjusting skills will be accomplished. Experiential learning will include the opportunity for students to adjust in a laboratory setting under close direct supervision for the purpose of skill development. In addition, a venipuncture module will be taught during this course.
    • Extremities Analysis & Technique
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course will include all of the following: Chiropractic analysis of upper and lower extremities with Palmer Package adjusting skills for the extremities. There will also be a comprehensive use of the Palmer Package chiropractic analysis and adjustment skills for spinal subluxation reduction. The spinal analysis will include the use of inspection, palpation, skin temperature analysis, leg length analysis and radiographic analysis that will be used for clinical methods. Intermediate full spine adjusting skills and toggle recoil will be accomplished. Experiential learning will include the opportunity for students to adjust in a laboratory setting under close, direct supervision for the purpose of skill development.
    • Special Populations & Active Care
      • 5 Credit(s)
        Advanced full-spine and extremity adjusting skills will be accomplished focusing on adjusting special populations including pregnant patients, infants, children, aging patients and patients with mobility challenges. Advanced radiographic signs and mensuration will be accomplished. Concepts of Active Care, incorporating the use of exercise strategies and rehabilitation procedures into chiropractic practice, will be studied.
    • Ergonomics & Passive Care
      • 5 Credit(s)
        Application of patient education skills and public health knowledge to concepts of ergonomics is covered. Theory and application of passive care including physiotherapeutic modalities used to complement chiropractic care will be included. Indications and contra-indications to the use of physiotherapeutic modalities will be studied.
    • Health & Chiropractic Care for Families
      • 5 Credit(s)
        This course will be a comprehensive study of health-related issues specific chiropractic care for children and women who are pregnant. Skills in physical exam and developmental assessment of neonates through adolescence will be discussed, as well as, aspects unique to patient care and chiropractic management of the pregnant patient, the role of chiropractic care in the birth process, neonatal care through adolescence will be incorporated. CPR for the professional rescuer is taught to teach those with a duty to act (professional rescuers) the skills needed to respond appropriately to breathing and cardiac emergencies including the use of automated external defibrillators (AED's)
  • Foundations
    • Introduction to Philosophy & Practice
      • 2 Credit(s)
        An introductory study of the philosophy and principles of chiropractic, including the constructs of subluxation, will be the foundation for the student of the philosophy and principles of chiropractic. A study of the Palmer family and other significant figures and major events in chiropractic history are explored.
    • Professional Dialogues
      • 2 Credit(s)
        An in-depth study of philosophy as it relates to the chiropractic profession, with a focus on the 33 Principles of Chiropractic. Concepts and significance of patient education will be introduced using the Palmer patient education materials. Clinical correlation to cervical and thoracic spine health, development and common conditions will be incorporated.
    • Professional Ethics & Communication
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Ethical standards for the Doctor of Chiropractic student and Doctor of Chiropractic will be presented. The impact and influence of professional ethics will be evaluated. Professional conduct in patient interactions will be explored. Ethical, effective and evidenced based communication skills for the healthcare provider will be emphasized and practiced.
    • Subluxation Theories I
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Application of basic science principles to subluxation processes, pain syndromes, and the manifestation of autonomic/visceral symptoms will be discussed. Homeostatic mechanisms of the nervous system will be discussed relative to the subluxation complex, chronic pain & inflammation, neurogenic inflammation, and tissue healing. Clinical applications from the Palmer Tenets will be discussed.
    • Subluxation Theories II
      • 2 Credit(s)
        The subluxation complex and other theoretic models of subluxation will be discussed in further detail in relation to clinical syndromes such as facet syndrome, sacroiliac syndrome, disc herniation, headache and internal disc disruption. Pathologic changes in spinal/musculoskeletal tissues will be described along with related neurological mechanisms, such as peripheral nociceptive sensitization, central nociceptive sensitization, and neuroplasticity. Biomechanical and neurological theories of spinal adjustments will be reviewed.
    • Toxicology
      • 2 Credit(s)
        The pharmacologic and toxicologic aspects of chemicals as related to health and chiropractic will be explored.
    • Basic Science Review
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Review of general concepts for general anatomy, spinal anatomy and physiology in preparation of NBCE Part I exams.
    • Health Psychology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Normal and abnormal psychological factors influencing chiropractic care will be explored, with a focus on identifying factors that can interfere with patient compliance and recognition of clinical indications for referral to psychological health professionals. Psychosocial factors impacting health and wellness and concepts of stress management will be explored. The Palmer Tenets will be reviewed in discussion of the incorporation of ancillary procedures into the practice of chiropractic.
    • Professional Responsibilities
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course is an integrated study of patient contracting, patient management guidelines, functioning in a multi-doctor and/or multidisciplinary practice. A study of the legal responsibilities, basic concepts of jurisprudence and risk management, including prevention of medical errors, associated with chiropractic practice. Application of jurisprudence to chiropractic case management, with and emphasis on ethics in business management, is covered. The doctor-patient relationship regarding sexual harassment prevention and boundaries is discussed. Regulatory issues for mandatory reporting responsibilities such as issues including child abuse, elder abuse, and communicable disease reporting. HIPAA training and coding to include diagnostic codes, procedure codes and evaluation/management codes for the chiropractic professional is provided in preparation for entry into the Palmer Clinic System.
    • Practice Regulations
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Chiropractic philosophy and principles related to the political aspects of chiropractic practice are explored and applied to a study of the current political climate of the chiropractic profession. A discussion of professional leadership and responsibility including chiropractic case management, Florida state laws and rules, OSHA regulations and the potential impact of chiropractic on public health and HIV/AIDS will be explored.
    • Health Care Marketing & Patient Education
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course is a study of the spectrum of business opportunities as they relate to the practice of chiropractic. The entrepreneurial aspects of managing a chiropractic business operation will be presented. Startup decision-making processes regarding the selection of an appropriate legal entity and the determination of a suitable practice location will be examined. The legal difference between practicing as a chiropractic associate versus an independent contractor will be identified and evaluated. Comparative factors associated with a new practice startup compared to the purchase of an existing practice will be explored. The preparation of a detailed marketing plan and its importance for practice development will also be covered.
    • Special Imaging
      • 1 Credit(s)
        An introduction of special imaging. This includes common and uncommon presentations of skeletal and visceral conditions likely to be found in the primary care practice of the Doctor of Chiropractic. The course covers the following categories of pathology: normal variants/anomalies; dysplasia; trauma; spondylolisthesis; arthritis; neoplasia to include tumor-like conditions; infection; metabolic; endocrine; and hematological disorders. Synthesis and evaluation of scientific and clinical information will be the platform for the continued development of clinical reasoning and patient management skills. Focus will be on the students' ability to develop and apply reasoning skills appropriately.
    • Financial Management
      • 2 Credit(s)
        The class is a study of the entrepreneurial concepts and procedures relating to the practice of chiropractic and practice ownership. Factors in determining a site and designing a facility plan will be examined. Personal financial status evaluations and commercial funding sources will be explored. The process of creating and implementing a comprehensive reimbursement policy and procedure plan will be demonstrated. The importance of a well-designed business plan will be studied, and the process of development of a business plan will be performed.
    • Billing & Coding
      • 1 Credit(s)
        This course will teach the student the proper methods of documentation, coding, and billing to be in compliance with current industry and governmental regulations. Students will engage in classroom learning and small group activities designed to help them understand the most current aspects of the third-party system and prepare them to handle this aspect of private practice.
    • Practice Management
      • 2 Credit(s)
        Business concepts of practice management related to practice startup plans, operations, employment and narrative reporting will be the focus of study. Management of office procedures and regulatory laws will be explored in the context of practice management. A startup timetable outlining the elements of getting a practice opened will be demonstrated. Human resource issues will be explored relating to hiring, training, benefits, discipline policies and termination. Management of office procedures using metrics and benchmarks for assessment and improvement will be presented. Concepts behind effective narrative reporting and quality disability evaluations will be explored.
    • Wellness in Chiropractic
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Principles of wellness in chiropractic will be explored. The impact and influence of chiropractic in preventive care and wellness promotion will be evaluated. Evidenced based health risk assessment and wellness promotion interventions will be studied and implemented. A multifaceted wellness program for a chiropractic practice will be created.
    • Planning for Practice Success
      • 2 Credit(s)
        The learner's evaluation and synthesis of knowledge and understanding of patient and practice management will be applied to producing a capstone project. The final assignment will demonstrate the student's acumen in financial and operational issues of owning and managing a chiropractic practice. The student will create and produce chiropractic clinic business start-up and operation plans. This will include the process of preparing and presenting a mission statement, strategic plan, marketing plan and business operations plan for a start-up chiropractic practice.
    • Pain & Stress Management
      • 1 Credit(s)
        Principles of pain and stress management will be explored. The impact and influence of evidence-based psychological and physical interventions for pain and stress management will be studied and implemented. An in-depth mastery of identification assessment and interventions of psychosocial factors in pain syndromes and musculoskeletal disorders will be achieved.
  • Function
    • Evidence Based Clinical Practice
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The course provides an introduction to the methodology by which new knowledge is discovered, disseminated, and incorporated into patient care. The scientific method and the evidence-based chiropractic model will serve as the foundation for the course. A significant portion of the course will focus on appraisal of literature with a chiropractic focus and how the evidence might be incorporated into improving patient care. The information literacy portion of this course focuses on the different types of literature and the tools by which to access the literature. The medical terminology portion of this course will cover the language used by health-care professionals so that the student may become an effective communicator within their field.
    • Biochemistry I
      • 5 Credit(s)
        The course provides an introduction to the molecules, macromolecules, and processes found in living systems. The structures of nucleotides, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates are studied. The corresponding higher-order structures, i.e. enzymes, nucleic acids, membranes, and polysaccharides, are related to their biological functions. The kinetics and mechanisms of enzymes and the central metabolic pathways are discussed. The energetics of biological systems are examined with a quantitative approach.
    • Neurology of Spine & PNS
      • 4 Credit(s)
        This course will include a study of physiology and pathology related to the nervous system focusing on the spinal cord and peripheral nervous system. The fundamentals of pathology, including cellular adaptation, cell death, inflammation, genetics, neoplasia and the common pathologies of the integumentary system will be also covered.
    • Spine Biomechanics & Exam
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course will include a study of normal and abnormal biomechanics of the spine and extremities; including an introduction to models of subluxation. Physical examination skills including functional, orthopedic, and neurological evaluation of the patient focusing on the spine will be studied.
    • Biochemistry II
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course is designed to study the role of dietary nutrients in the maintenance of health and disease prevention. Nutritional characteristics of macronutrients and micronutrients will be discussed in detail. Concepts of biochemistry will be applied to patient nutritional care and dietary analysis with a focus on nutrition.
    • Neurology of Brain & Brainstem
      • 5 Credit(s)
        A study of normal, developmental and abnormal aspects of the central nervous system, with emphasis on the special senses and endocrine system physiology and biochemistry. Head and neck physiology including aspects of aging and pathophysiology will be explored. Normal and abnormal biomechanics of the TMJ and skull are identified. Physical examination skill development will be inclusive of the comprehensive neurological evaluation. Emergency procedures and protocol related to open and closed head trauma will be included. Clinical correlations to the health, development and common conditions affecting the head and neck region will be a focus of study.
    • Endocrine & Immunology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        A study of normal, developmental and abnormal aspects of the endocrine and immunological system physiology and biochemistry. Clinical correlations to the health, development and common conditions affecting the endocrine and immunology will be a focus of study.
    • GI Physiology & Pathology
      • 4 Credit(s)
        A study of the gastrointestinal system physiology and pathophysiology. Development and aging of the gastrointestinal system. Acute abdominal emergencies, Spine Biomechanics and LBP will be discussed. Skill development in physical examination of the abdomen will be provided including laboratory procedures. Clinical correlations to health, development and common conditions related to the gastrointestinal system will be a focus of study.
    • GU Physiology & Pathology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        A study of the urinary and reproductive systems physiology, microbiology, biochemistry and pathophysiology. Investigation of the body's normal and abnormal immune response to infectious and chemical agents. Development and aging of the urinary and reproductive systems. Clinical correlations to health, development and common conditions related to the urinary and reproductive systems will be a focus of study.
    • Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Physiology & Pathology
      • 5 Credit(s)
        A study of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems physiology, biochemistry and pathophysiology. Investigation of the body's normal and abnormal immune response to infectious and chemical agents. Normal and abnormal biomechanics of the thoracic cage and chest. Clinical laboratory analysis including blood count and serum chemistry will be incorporated. Development and aging of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Clinical correlations to cardiovascular and respiratory health, development and common conditions will be a focus of study.
    • Cardiopulmonary Integrated Diagnosis
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course will include the physical examination of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems as well as competency training in standard first aid procedures. Clinical correlations to cardiovascular and respiratory health conditions will be a focus of study.
    • Basic Nutrition
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course is designed to study the role of dietary nutrients in the maintenance of health and disease prevention. Nutritional characteristics of macronutrients and micronutrients will be discussed in detail. Concepts of biochemistry will be applied to patient nutritional care and dietary analysis with a focus on nutrition.
    • Pathology
      • 6 Credit(s)
        This is a capstone course intended as an intense review of the structural and functional abnormalities that result in diseases of organs and systems. Principles of general and systemic pathology will be covered, with an emphasis on neuromusculoskeletal, cardiovascular, immune-mediated and neoplastic disorders.
    • Introduction to Radiology
      • 1 Credit(s)
        A capstone experience in normal radiographic patterns is the focus of the course. Focus will be on the students' ability to develop a search pattern and identify normal anatomy on radiographs appropriately.
    • Radiology Diagnosis I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        A capstone experience in normal and abnormal radiographic patterns is the focus of the course. This includes common and uncommon presentations of skeletal and visceral conditions likely to be found in the primary care practice of the Doctor of Chiropractic. Synthesis and evaluation of scientific and clinical information will be the platform for the continued development of clinical reasoning and patient management skills. Focus will be on the students' ability to develop and apply reasoning skills appropriately.
    • Radiology Diagnosis II
      • 3 Credit(s)
        A capstone experience in normal and abnormal radiographic patterns. This includes common and uncommon presentations of visceral conditions likely to be found in the primary care practice of the Doctor of Chiropractic. Synthesis and evaluation of scientific and clinical information will be the platform for the continued development of clinical reasoning and patient management skills. Focus will be on the student's ability to develop and apply reasoning skills appropriately.
    • Neuromusculoskeletal Diagnosis
      • 4 Credit(s)
        Advanced integration and application of clinical and basic science knowledge to patient presentations focusing on the health of the aging patient will be covered. Clinical chemistry and laboratory analysis and basic concepts of differential diagnosis are also investigated and applied. Patient presentations including wellness, common, and uncommon conditions will be the platform for the continued development of clinical reasoning and patient management skills. The focus will be on the learner's ability to develop and apply reasoning skills appropriately.
    • Clinical Nutrition
      • 5 Credit(s)
        This course prepares students to apply principles of dietetics and the biomedical and nutrition sciences to design and manage effective nutrition programs as part of clinical treatment and therapy programs. It includes instruction on human nutrition, nutrient metabolism, supplementation, and the role of foods and nutrition in health promotion and disease prevention using an evidence-based approach to care.
  • Clinic
    • Student Clinic Practice
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course focuses on the student intern being instructed in the use of clinic forms and the application of clinic procedures. they learn through lecture and laboratory application of these processes. the student intern will demonstrate level appropriate competency in history taking, physical examination, NMS examination, psychosocial assessment, diagnosis, case management, patient education, adjusting using Palmer approved techniques, record keeping, case follow-up, wellness, nutrition, doctor-patient relations/ethics/integrity, and non-adjustive therapeutics.
    • Patient Management I
      • 9 Credit(s)
        This course focuses on the novice intern providing patient care under the guidance of licensed doctors of chiropractic in the clinical setting, including supervised care of patients for the full range of conditions related to chiropractic care. Emphasis will be on the development of patient management skills, including specific subluxation analysis and care, case management, patient education, along with demonstration of clinical competence is also included. Interns will participate in clinical educational development in active learning seminars with faculty clinicians and guest speakers focusing on addressing the needs and professional responsibilities associated with patient care.
    • Patient Management II
      • 9 Credit(s)
        This course focuses on the intermediate intern providing care under the guidance of licensed doctors in the clinical setting, including supervised clinical management of patients for the full range of conditions as well as health improvement via chiropractic care. Emphasis is placed on the development of professional skills, including specific chiropractic skills in subluxation analysis and correction, as well as patient education, along with demonstration of clinical competency. Interns will participate in clinical education development in active learning seminars focusing on addressing the needs and professional responsibilities associated with patients presenting with a complexity of conditions in a grand rounds setting.
    • Patient Management III
      • 9 Credit(s)
        This course focuses on the advanced intern providing care under the guidance of licensed doctors in the clinical setting, including supervised clinical management of patients for the full range of conditions as well as health improvement via chiropractic care. Emphasis is placed on the development of professional skills, including specific chiropractic skills in subluxation analysis and correction, as well as patient education, along with demonstration of clinical competency. Interns will participate in clinical education development in active learning seminars focusing on addressing the needs and professional responsibilities associated with patients presenting with a complexity of conditions, as well sharing cases with lower quarter students in a grand rounds setting.
    • Practice Development Quarter
      • 9 Credit(s)
        Provides the opportunity for learners to custom-tailor their learning experiences to prepare and excite them for the various professional opportunities available within the chiropractic profession. Interns will be mentored and supported in mastery of specified learning objectives while encouraged to select from a prescribed range of options that meet their personal objectives to prepare for practice or advanced professional training residencies. A significant part of this transition phase involves clinical experiences. Students will be able to select from a variety of clinical settings, as well as work with mentors regarded as specialists in caring for specific sub-populations or following established care protocols. Interns who have completed all quantitative clinical requirements for graduation may elect to participate in an off-site educational experience. Where legally permitted by law, qualified students may complete a preceptor internship in an approved field practice located in areas where they wish to establish practice. The preceptor field training experience often leads to immediate postgraduate employment as an associates, thus facilitating easier practice start-up.
  • Structure
    • Spine, Shoulder & Hip Anatomy
      • 4 Credit(s)
        Students will acquire a thorough knowledge of the structural organization of the spine, shoulder and hip and become proficient in describing the functional gross anatomy; students will understand the structural relationships between individual parts that form an integrated whole; students will be able to interpret human anatomy as a particular set of solutions to problems correlate to clinical situations; students will become fluent in the terminology and vocabulary of gross anatomy. Basic normal radiographic anatomy of the spine, shoulder and hip will be presented with and integration of clinical correlations.
    • Histology & Embryology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Students will acquire a basic knowledge of the cytology and the histology of four types of tissues; students will also understand the first three weeks of development of human embryo; students will be able to correlate the histology and embryology to clinical situations; students will become fluent in the terminology and vocabulary of histology and embryology.
    • Basic Neuroanatomy
      • 4 Credit(s)
        This course covers the microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of the spinal cord, meninges, and autonomic nervous system. General somatic, visceral, and autonomic pathways will be introduced.
    • Cervical Anatomy
      • 2 Credit(s)
        The anatomy and embryology of the cervical region will be studied. Emphasis is placed on the visceral and cervical back structures.
    • Advanced Neuroanatomy
      • 4 Credit(s)
        A study of the structure of the central nervous system including embryology, histology, and pathways for the special senses. A study of developmental and abnormal/pathologic nervous system anatomy and histology are also considered.
    • Head Anatomy
      • 2 Credit(s)
        A study of the gross anatomy of the head, including embryology. Emphasis will be placed on the oral and nasal cavities and organs of special senses.
    • Chest & Abdomen Anatomy I
      • 3 Credit(s)
        A study of embryology, anatomy, histology, biochemistry and pathoanatomy of the gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive systems. Basic normal radiographic anatomy of the abdomen and pelvis is introduced. Clinical correlations to gastrointestinal and genitourinary health, development and common conditions will be a focus of study.
    • Microbiology & Public Health
      • 3 Credit(s)
        The course addresses the basic structure, functions and growth requirements of microorganisms. Additionally, method of control of microorganisms followed by a study of major pathogenic bacteria, virus and fungi, with and emphasis on the relationship between the virulence of the microorganism and the resistance of the host are included. Pathogenic and helminthic conditions are also studied. Also addressed are the health issues facing today's communities from the foundation of community health to the health of the nation, healthcare delivery and environmental health and safety.
    • Chest & Abdomen Anatomy II
      • 3 Credit(s)
        A study of embryology, anatomy, histology, biochemistry and clinical pathology of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Basic normal radiographic anatomy of the chest is introduced. The study of toxicology will be accomplished. Clinical laboratory analysis and special imaging studies will be integrated. Clinical correlations to cardiovascular and respiratory health, development and common conditions as well as preventive health and wellness will be a focus of study.
    • Extremities Anatomy
      • 2 Credit(s)
        A study of anatomy and histology of the upper and lower extremities. Clinical correlations to upper and lower extremity health, development and common conditions, such as repetitive stress injuries and trauma, will be a focus of study. Clinical relevance of anatomy salient to the chiropractic clinician will be emphasized.
    • Upper Extremities: Exam & Pathology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        A study of the common and uncommon upper extremity pathologies encountered in the chiropractic setting. The physical examination and critical clinical thought process will be emphasized in the laboratory setting, while the detailed presentation of extremity pathology and lesions will be presented didactically through lectures. Clinical correlations to upper extremity health, development and common conditions, such as repetitive stress injuries and trauma will be a focus of study.
    • Integrated Assessment I
      • 4 Credit(s)
        This course covers advanced integration and application of clinical science knowledge to patient presentations and clinical reasoning. Patient presentations including wellness, development, common and uncommon conditions. Patient assessment skills will be reviewed and integrated to include outcome assessment measures, and will be the platform for the continued development of clinical reasoning and patient management skills. Focus will be on the student's synthesis and evaluation of cognitive information needed for critical thinking and clinical reasoning.
    • X-Ray Physics
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course covers concepts of X-ray physics including general radiation concepts, X-ray production and interactions with matter. Protection and biologic effects will be covered as well as the components of the X-ray unit and the factors of exposure, technique charts, filters, beam limiters and tube limits. Discussions of radiographic quality, film, film holders and intensifying screens along with darkroom and film processing will be included.
    • Lower Extremities: Exam & Path
      • 3 Credit(s)
        A study of the common and uncommon lower extremity pathologies encountered in the chiropractic setting. A correlative review of relevant anatomy will be carried out. The physical examination and critical clinical thought process will be emphasized in the laboratory setting, while the detailed presentation of lower extremity pathology and lesions will be presented didactically through lectures. Clinical correlations to lower extremity health, development and common conditions, such as stress injuries and trauma, will be a focus of study.
    • Integrated Assessment II
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Advanced integration and application of clinical sciences and clinical reasoning to the evaluation and assessment of visceral conditions and gender related health issues likely to be found in the primary care practice of the chiropractic clinician will be the platform for the continued development of clinical reasoning and patient management skill. Focus will be upon the learner's investigation of cognitive information needed for application to patient management.
    • X-Ray Positioning
      • 2 Credit(s)
        This course will prepare the student to create diagnostic images of the axial and appendicular skeleton. Positioning lecture material will be supported by experiential lab exercises to include radiation safety practices. Image quality assessment criteria, to include radiographic anatomy and physics principles, will be discussed and actively applied in the evaluation of radiographs. The application of relevant legal and ethical standards will also be discussed.
    • Normal Aging & Development
      • 3 Credit(s)
        Phases of development throughout life will be evaluated in relationship to health care and wellness. An understanding of anatomical, physiological and psychological development will be synthesized in the evaluation and management of patients throughout various phases of life. Integrated patient assessment, including physical examination, radiological and chiropractic analysis and the application of complex critical thinking and clinical reasoning, will be applied to patient management. In addition, emergency medical procedures including open and closed head trauma will be covered. Cases of high complexity will be presented to develop critical thinking skills.
    • Obstetrics & Gynecology
      • 3 Credit(s)
        This course encompasses a comprehensive study of obstetrics, gynecology, sexually transmitted diseases, normal physiologic changes of the pregnant patient as well as clinical manifestations of pregnancy related disorders. The course will also include gender related health issues, skill in physical examination with clinical correlations, coverage of basic and specialized areas of obstetrics and gynecology for survival and success as a primary health care provider. This course will cover the normal birth process and common complications related to antepartum and postpartum periods. Physical examination and assessment skills with focus on breast, prostate, proctological and gynecological examinations.
  • Clinical Enrichment/Electives
    • Gonstead Technique I
      • 0 Credit(s)
        The course refines the skills learned in the core curriculum with attention to X-ray analysis and adjusting procedures of the cervical and thoracic spine.
    • Gonstead Tech Advanced Lumbo-Pelvic
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course refines the skills learned in the core curriculum with attention to Gonstead X-ray analysis and adjusting procedures of the lumbar spine and pelvis.
    • Thompson-Terminal Point Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Analytical and adjustive methods as written and practiced by Dr. J. Clay Thompson will be taught. Derefield and cervical syndrome analytical procedures, special approaches to the adjustive correction of pelvic misalignments, spondylolisthesis, ribcage and other spinal areas, terminal point table, and emphasis on practical work will be covered. The Thompson Technique is a low force, specific adjustment technique, which includes the Derefield-Thompson Leg Analysis System.
    • Sports Elective
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Sports Elective is designed for students to gain knowledge in common on-field treatment approaches. It will prepare students for emergencies that may occur at a sporting event, such as on-field emergency protocols, spinal and head trauma, implementing the ABC’s of emergency care, skin lesions and extremity evaluation and treatment. It will also cover principles of stretching, myofascial release technique and taping.
    • Upper Cervical Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Palmer Toggle Recoil, Grostic, Blair, NUCCA and Atlas Orthogonal Upper Cervical Specific line-of-correction calculations for a side posture atlas adjustment will be taught. Chiropractic neuro-orthopedic pre- and post-adjustment examination with emphasis on practical work and comparisons with other total spine methods will be covered.
    • Advanced Upper Cervical Specific Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course is a defined study in Upper Cervical adjusting procedures utilizing instrument adjusting techniques. It incorporates a review of X-ray fundamentals, refined analysis procedures and resultant specific vectors of adjusting. Cervical Biomechanics are defined and essential in correct table placement for the most effective adjustment end-result. Specific vector adjusting requires accurate X-rays, complete analysis of the Upper Cervical Anatomy, five step table placement procedures and accurate alignment of the instrument to the Atlas Transverse Process.
    • Grostic Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Introductory course on the Grostic Procedure including Upper Cervical Specific line-of-correction calculations for a side posture atlas adjustment; chiropractic neuro-orthopedic pre- and post-adjustment examination; an emphasis on practical work.
    • Sacro-Occipital Technique- Part I
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Patient categorization and the basic treatment regimens for the SOT categories; blocking methods and category management; analysis of physical findings as written by Dr. M.B. Dejarnette; basic cranial maneuvers and emphasis on practical experience.
    • Sacro-Occipital Technique - Part II
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course is a continuation of SOT Part I.
    • Activator Methods I
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Activator procedures, including mechanisms of subluxation, analysis, adjustive procedures and light force Activator adjusting instrument.
    • Flexion Distraction/Decompression
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course provides instruction on flexion-distraction Protocols I & II for the cervical and lumbar spine. Instruction on decompression using the standard decompression table (DX2) will also be provided. Indications and contraindications to decompression will be taught. Only students passing this course can provide flexion-distraction and decompression in our clinics using the flexion-distraction tables (including the Cox 7 tables) and the standard (Dynatron DX2) decompression table.
    • Pettibon Technique
      • 0 Credit(s)
        The Pettibon System is a comprehensive rehabilitation program for the spine's hard and soft tissues. It uses adjustments, in office rehab, and home rehab for faster progress. This course covers the fundamentals of the Pettibon System: normal spinal alignment, studies with pre-care and post-care X-rays, postural evaluation and functional testing, restoring lordosis, Pettibon Weighting System TM, soft tissue physiology, The Pettibon X-ray Procedures, interpreting x-ray markings and measurements, how a stress X-ray determines patients' ability to respond to care, applying Pettibon adjustments based on X-ray listings, daily postural exams, and daily functional tests.
    • Pierce Pro-Adjustor
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course will deal with the structural and biomechanical considerations of the spine. A specialized technique course designed to reach competency in theory, analysis, adjusting skills and patient management, utilizing the Pierce Technique and the Pro-Adjustor instrument.
    • Systems Approach to Nutrition
      • 0 Credit(s)
        This course focuses on the fundamentals of whole food nutrition and supplementation for various health conditions and overall optimal well-being. Special attention will be paid to implementing whole food nutrition in the health and regulation of all organ systems in the human body including a review of major biochemical and physiological mechanisms. The student will also gain an understanding of the symptom survey, nutritional examinations and basic implementation of whole food nutrition into a health care practice.
    • Activator Methods II
      • 0 Credit(s)
        Introduction in the Track II Activator Methods "advanced analysis" system.
Contact Us

Davenport, Iowa, Campus
Academic Affairs
(563) 884-5466

San Jose, Calif., Campus
Academic Administration
(408) 944-6021

Port Orange, Fla., Campus
Academic Affairs
(386) 763-2760 

Top