Davenport, Iowa, Campus Only

We generally offer required core courses in the same trimester each year. We offer electives as needed or as faculty are available. Here's the typical schedule of the core courses.

Year One –

  • Take required coursework.
  • Create a professional development plan.
  • Begin Practicum #1.

Year Two –

  • Take elective coursework. You may focus on areas of interest to you, including clinical biomechanics, clinical neuroscience or experimental clinical research.
  • Finish Practicum #1.
  • Begin and finish Practicum #2.

We Will Help with Your Development Plan

Palmer faculty forms a Graduate Advisory Committee (GAC) just for you. You will select a clinical research faculty member as your primary mentor to chair your GAC. Then, together, you will choose at least two additional members to serve on your GAC. The entire committee then guides you in creating a professional development plan. They will also help in registering for core courses, planning additional coursework to support your research emphasis, and developing your research practicum projects.

Research Practicum Projects

You must successfully complete two practicum projects. These projects are patient-oriented research. They'll be based on your interests and your faculty mentor's interests.  

You will be directly involved in clinical research and working with patients as you collect, analyze and interpret their data. Your Graduate Advisory Committee approves your projects based on an initial plan and final written and oral reports. Scholarly products, such as publishable-quality manuscripts, are desirable.

Your two practicum projects may be:
  • Part of a larger research question being explored by the faculty mentors
  • A separate exploration all together
  • Related to one another as part of an overall project or unrelated.

Davenport, Iowa, Campus M.S. Program

  • Introduction to Clinical Research Method
    • 1 Credit(s)
      This course addresses the essentials of research. Focus will be on the formulating and planning stages of a research study, including: framing a research problem; determining the supporting knowledge; identifying a theory base; developing a research question; and selecting an appropriate study design strategy. Participants will also learn the basic components of a research proposal.
  • Biostatistical Thinking and Reasoning
    • 1 Credit(s)
      This course includes topics on general statistical concepts such as: terminology; basic probabilistic notions; measurement issues, including sources of variation, types of measurement error (e.g. chance, systematic) and strategies for minimizing measurement error; types of variables; data description and exploration, the importance of appropriately summarizing data; and the role of statistical methods, in general, in the scientific research process.
  • Critical Appraisal of Literature
    • 1 Credit(s)
      Students will develop the skills to find and make sense of research evidence published in the open literature. Course content includes efficient literature search strategies and the application of formal rules of evidence to evaluate clinical research. The aim of the course is to enable students to perform quick but effective reviews of the clinical literature and electronic databases and to educate students in the practice of evidence-based principles.
  • Statistical Computing and Data Managemen
    • 1 Credit(s)
      Students learn statistical computing skills such as use of the statistical software package SPSS, data entry methods including quality control/assurance issues, creating new data files, accessing/editing existing data files, storing data files (e.g., confidentiality of patient/subject data), dataset cleaning, copying/pasting cross software applications, and conversions of data file types. (See also A570.)
  • Bioethics I
    • 2 Credit(s)
      This course will provide the student an overview of the issues involved in the modern day bioethical debate. By using a combination of lecture and case-based approaches, students gain knowledge about the multitude of issues they will confront both in clinical practice and in the discharge of duties related to clinical research. The course uses an approach that examines issues that are beyond the general scope of chiropractic practice, but in doing so the student will be able to synthesize information and begin to apply principles of bioethics to his or her daily professional activities.
  • Bioethics II
    • 1 Credit(s)
      This course focuses on the ethical issues specific to the practice of clinical research. Students gain knowledge and understanding of the institutional review board and the processes used by it in making determinations about a research project, the development of an appropriate informed consent form, the use of animals in research, the ethics surrounding data management and journal publication, responsible authorship, policies for handling misconduct, data sharing and institutional vs. individual responsibilities for scientific integrity.
  • Scientific Writing
    • 2 Credit(s)
      The elements of scientific writing are presented in an experiential setting. The course covers types of scientific articles, including case reports, review articles of the literature (descriptive and meta-analysis), original data reports, commentaries, and editorials. Emphasis is placed upon writing in a clear and comprehensive manner for particular target audiences. Scientific style is discussed in detail, as are citation methods. Discussions are included on ethical issues surrounding publication and authorship. Students are responsible for preparing their own research report, literature review or case report; and they review and critique each other's work over the course of the term.
  • Scientific Presentation Skills
    • 2 Credit(s)
      This course is designed to cover topics related to scientific presentations. It is delivered in an interactive format combining lectures, in-class presentations by students, and hand-on workshops in the computer lab. The goal of this course is to develop the skills needed to effectively convey information at scientific meetings and conferences. Students develop, practice and deliver to an audience both a platform and poster presentation.
  • Statistical Graphics
    • 2 Credit(s)
      This course provides instruction for each phase of proposal development, from framing the specific aims and developing appropriate methodology to performing the literature review and adhering to the directions and specifications for grant application forms. The essential ingredients for the course are to provide iterative feedback and encourage constructive criticism for grant proposals so that students gain proficiency in grant writing. Program faculty and students will review and provide feedback for each phase of proposal development. The course will provide a framework for understanding the peer review process, NIH funding mechanisms, and strategies for success in obtaining external support. (See also A572.)
  • Research Proposal Development
    • 2 Credit(s)
      This course provides instruction for each phase of proposal development, from framing the specific aims and developing appropriate methodology to performing the literature review and adhering to the directions and specifications for grant application forms. The essential ingredients for the course are to provide iterative feedback and encourage constructive criticism for grant proposals so that students gain proficiency in grant writing. Program faculty and students will review and provide feedback for each phase of proposal development. The course will provide a framework for understanding the peer review process, NIH funding mechanisms, and strategies for success in obtaining external support.
  • Collaboration and Team Building in Clini
    • 1 Credit(s)
      This course is offered in a two-day workshop format. The importance and essential features of effective interdisciplinary collaboration will be presented and participants will gain experience in building the team approach necessary for accomplishing clinical research projects, particularly in CAM research where team members have diverse professional and academic backgrounds.
  • Grant Writing Skills
    • 1 Credit(s)
      This course includes three one-hour mini-workshops followed by a three-day workshop. Mini-workshops are: Preparing NIH Biosketches, Project Personnel: Key, Other and Justification, and Mock NIH Review Panel. Half of the workshop is didactic and covers the nature of a strong grant proposal, specifics of the research plan, keys to writing specific aims, revision and resubmission issues and the need for persistence. The rest of the workshop is dedicated to individual meetings with students working on the specific aims for their research proposals.
  • Survey of Chiropractic Research
    • 2 Credit(s)
      The history and content of chiropractic and related CAM research is presented, as well as important issues affecting CAM professions research productivity and infrastructure development. The course requires participants to review and discuss key papers, books and other documents important to understanding the chiropractic research agenda.
  • Principles of Epidemiology
    • 3 Credit(s)
      This course focuses on epidemiologic concepts and methods including the design of descriptive and analytic studies, application of epidemiology to public health and chiropractic research and practice, and communication and dissemination of epidemiologic findings. Course content includes: types and comparisons of epidemiologic studies including observational studies and clinical trials; evaluating validity, causal relations, chance, bias, confounding and interaction; applying biologic concepts and measures of disease occurrence; and assessing the validity and reliability of diagnostic and screening tests.
  • Biostatistics I
    • 3 Credit(s)
      This course covers general statistical concepts; study designs and sampling schemes; numerical descriptive statistics; statistical methods (both estimation and hypothesis testing; parametric and non-parametric) for one-group, two-group and multi-group designs; and sample size and power considerations for designed experimental studies. Homework and exams are take-home format; each includes the critical review of research articles as well as analysis of real datasets using SPSS, followed by written, tabular and graphical presentation of the results with interpretation. (See also A571.)
  • Biostatistics II: Linear Regression
    • 1 Credit(s)
      This course uses lecture and illustration of the methods of the statistical computing and modeling process on real datasets. Course content includes: notation and terminology; correlation, simple linear regression techniques and diagnostics, and the ability to interpret the results of regression analysis. Homework is take-home format and involves analysis of real datasets, followed by written, tabular and graphical presentation of the results with interpretation, and critical review of articles that use correlation and simple linear regression for data analysis. (See also A574.)
  • Biostatistics II: ANOVA & Regression Mo
    • 2 Credit(s)
      This course uses lecture and illustration of the methods of the statistical computing and modeling process on real datasets. Course content includes multiple linear regression, simple and multiple logistic regression, and two-way and multi-way analysis of variance. Other topics to be covered may include statistical methods for repeated measures and methods of handling missing values. (See also A575.)
  • Clinical Biomechanics
    • 3 Credit(s)
      This course is taught in two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory each week. It focuses on clinical biomechanics associated with the human body. Students learn the concepts and instrumentation to measure forces, motions and electrical activity of muscles as related to human body. Course topics include biomechanics of manual therapy, electromyography of muscle, biomechanics of spine, postural balance, human response to unexpected loads, and human gait.
  • Ergonomics
    • 2 Credit(s)
      This course is taught in one hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory each week. It focuses on the occupational biomechanics associated with the ergonomics of humans in their work place setting, in particular the physiological and biomechanical aspects of human performance. Principles of physical work and human anthropometry are studied to enable the student to systematically design work places, processes, and systems that are consistent with human capabilities and limitations. Topics include repetitive motion disorders, manual materials handling, hand tool design and selection, and job analysis. (See also A582.)
  • Independent Study: Clinical Studies
    • 1 Credit(s)
      Independent Study courses are offered with the approval of the Graduate Program Oversight Committee. These courses permit the student to explore a narrow area of clinical research, which are not normally offered as part of the curriculum.
  • Independent Study: Neuroscience
    • 1 Credit(s)
  • Independent Study: Biomechanics
    • 1 Credit(s)
  • Research Practicum I
    • 1 Credit(s)
      The practicum project provides a mentored research experience for the student. Practicum experiences involve direct participation in clinical research, including working with research participants and patients and conducting data collection, analysis and interpretation. The student's graduate advisory committee approves the Practicum I project plan and the final written and oral reports of the project. Scholarly deliverables, such as publishable-quality manuscripts, are desirable.
  • Research Practicum II
    • 1 Credit(s)
      The practicum project provides a mentored research experience for the student. Practicum experiences involve direct participation in clinical research, including working with research participants and patients and conducting data collection, analysis and interpretation. The project for Practicum II can involve research on a completely different topic than Practicum I or can be an extension of that project. The student's graduate advisory committee approves the Practicum II project plan and the final written and oral reports of the project. Scholarly deliverables, such as publishable-quality manuscripts or grant applications, are desirable.
Contact Us

Davenport, Iowa, Campus
Academic Affairs
(563) 884-5466

San Jose, Calif., Campus
Academic Administration
(408) 944-6021

Port Orange, Fla., Campus
Academic Affairs
(386) 763-2760 

Katie Pohlman headshotKatie Pohlman, D.C., M.S.
2006 D.C. Graduate
2010 M.S. Graduate

“Since completing this program (Master of Science in Clinical Research), I have come to realize the importance of research in health care and have therefore decided to focus my career on chiropractic research. This program allowed me to secure a position in chiropractic research and focus on my career goals fulltime.” 

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